Announcement: Career Development Seminar on 4/16/2021

Bio Colloquium-April 14, 2021

REPOST:

You are invited to this week’s next Biology Colloquium, 11:10 AM on Wednesday 14 April 2021

Marcella Kelly, Virginia Tech University

An Ecologist’s Path Toward Studying Carnivore Co-Existence Across Ecosystems

Topic: Biology Colloquium – 14 April 2021
Time: Apr 14, 2021 10:45 AM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

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Meeting ID: 854 9835 2374
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Reflect, Reconnect, Refocus

Do What Supports Your Dreams

Welcome back from Spring Break! You have successfully made it to the middle point of Spring semester 2021. It has been a year of unprecedented obstacles and complicated adjustments. Yet, you have all applied yourselves and persevered in the face of adversity. It is in this light that you must bask. What this period is teaching you is how you have the inner strength to counteract whatever life throws at you. Learn this lesson well and carry it with you as you aim to end this semester and academic year strong.

This also marks the countdown to the final examination period. For some this may inflict anxiety and dread. I suggest that you consider a different outlook. Yes, Spring Break was a time for many of you to relax and regroup. But, I hope that some of you also reflected on your performance this far. Are you satisfied with the grades you earned? Maybe you reconnected with a hobby or point of inspiration from the past. What I am imploring each of you to do is refocus you energy on the things that will help you achieve the life goals you set for yourself.  Final exams are a great benchmark for you to show how well you have managed your time. It proves that you not only adapted to online learning, but you also mastered it. Have confidence in your work ethic and believe that regardless of the grade you earn, you are more knowledgeable than when the semester started.

 

Today’s Colloquium-Former Bio Faculty Dr. Stephane Boissinot

This week’s Biology Colloquium speaker is our former colleague, Stephane Boissinot, now with NYU Abu Dhabi. His presentation is titled: Ten Years of Research in Ethiopia: Adaptations to High Elevation in Frogs & Other Stories

The talk will begin at 11:10 AM. Zoom link follows.

John Waldman is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: Biology Colloquium – 7 Apr 2021
Time: Apr 7, 2021 10:45 AM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

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Meeting ID: 843 4713 5005
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Guest Blog: Making the most of Micro

Blog by Salisa Hudson, MA

3-25-2021

I miss saying “Hi, My name is Salisa and I am your lab technician. That means it is my job to ensure you have all the materials you need within the course to have a successful lab experience.” If you have walked into any of the three microbiology courses: Bio 201: General Microbiology, Bio 44: Food and Microbiology and Bio 45: Microbiology and Professional Studies; you have indeed met me and heard the beginning of the safety speech. I have worked in Queens College (QC) Biology Department as the microbiology laboratory technician for about eight years now. However, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, I haven’t been on campus in a full-time capacity for an entire year. This time at home has allowed me to reflect and I wanted to share my experience of being non-instructional faculty. This blog post will give you the student body some tips and tricks of mastering the microbiology lab courses here at QC.

First, it is a must to come to every class prepared. This is essential for most college courses but, exponentially more important for this wet lab course. Microbiology coursework is similar to the responsibilities of my position in that, its high level detailed work which requires a large amount of time-consuming labor. Therefore, the key to acing the required lab portion of this course is time management. It is essential to have your time planned out and a concise step-by-step guide for the lab is extremely helpful. Not having read up on the labs you are responsible for that day is the sure fire way to fail at time management. Please don’t assume that you can use class time to conduct your primary once over of the experiment. This is a bad idea for two reasons: the first is that it’s uncommon for one to get enough understanding of an experiment to perform efficiently having only read it once. The second is now you are wasting crucial class time, which has been instituted for getting the experiments done. Also, your instructor may be presenting valuable information not provided on the PowerPoint slides during lecture. When exam time comes, you don’t want to be working with a deficit of pertinent information.

Next, your safety is largely your responsibility. Having been in the teaching classroom as both an adjunct lecturer and a lab technician, I have seen a fair share of preventable accidents. It is very easy to get so consumed by the classroom, scientific equipment, your colleagues, etc.; that safety is no longer a priority. Safety is part of preparedness in a microbiology lab. We must know, understand, and respect all posted safety protocols and procedures. Most importantly, I can’t emphasize this enough, you must take them seriously! Although, we have heard “NO FOOD CONSUMPTION” in every lab we have ever stepped foot into there, there is somehow always Starbucks caramel mocha lattes or Dunkin Donuts in the trash can at the end of the day. I won’t go too in depth, however, handling 10 milliliters of Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus has never complemented anyone’s snack time. In the lab space, spills on the countertops, floors, equipment and carelessness around open flames are recipes for disaster. It has happened more times than I can count. Success in a microbiology lab goes hand in hand with taking all safety precautions. If you spend enough time in a lab you may get a bruise, bump, or ruined item of clothing however, inevitability and stupidity are very different situations.

This brings me to my final point: Work with Purpose. Working with a purpose is both motivating and exhilarating. When I am beginning the prep for the week on Monday (sometimes Saturday or Sunday, lol), my purpose is to ensure the classes run smoothly and conclude with exceptional lab results. That motivates me to push through the preparation of one thousand agar plates, fifteen hundred tubes of media and the multitude of repetitive work that must be completed for that week alone. Truthfully, the final product of a workweek executed flawlessly is always exhilarating to me. A great week has been one success lab after the next. Long days that begin at 7am and end at 11pm are over and the work purpose has been served. So, at the begin of every semester, establish that your purpose in this course to learn as much as you can about Microbiology, earn an A, and to bring your GPA up. Then you will come prepared and work hard in a safe manner that will result in you getting an end result you can be proud of. I will end the same way I end the safety talk of each and every microbiology wet lab with this wish, “Whatever year you are currently in, or whatever course you take….I hope you all get A’s.”

Women’s History Month-Guest Blogger

As part of ongoing Women’s History Month celebrations, the symBIOsis blog will feature a guest blogger. Ms. Salisa Hudson, MA is a College Laboratory Technician within the Queens College Biology Department. Ms. Hudson also is an adjunct lecturer for some of the department’s numerous Microbiology lab courses. Beyond her normal work assignments, Salisa often offers the following advice to students: “Target positions and roles that enable you to thrive, healthily, happily, and with purpose. Hard work determines it is possible…You deserve it all.” Look forward to the post from Ms. Salisa Hudson, MA later on this week.

       

Opportunity: Minority Mentorship Program

At QC, there’s a wonderful opportunity for ethnically underrepresented students interested in careers in Biotechnology and Medical Technology. On this Friday, March 19th, 2021, there will be an info session. Undergraduates, graduate students, and post-docs are encouraged to attend.

See attached flyer!SDMP flyer final

Biology Colloquium-March 24, 2021

REPOST:

This week’s presenter is Deborah Yelon, University of California – San Diego, speaking on Molecular Mechanisms Regulating Cardiac Architecture in Zebrafish.

The session will begin at 11:10 AM. Zoom link below.

Topic: Biology Colloquium – 24 Mar 2021
Time: Mar 24, 2021 10:45 AM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

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Meeting ID: 890 1318 1163
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Meeting ID: 890 1318 1163
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Black STEM Professionals Panel Discussion-Feb. 23, 2021

Please join us for the lively conversation.

Black History Month-Dr. Patricia Bath

Dr. Patricia Bath, an alumna of Hunter College, earned degrees in Chemistry and Physics in 1964. A graduate of Howard University Medical School, she had a passion for fighting blindness. After finishing a fellowship at Columbia University, Dr. Bath became the first African American resident in ophthalmology at New York University. Bath’s career as a groundbreaking ophthalmologist, researcher, physician, and educator was based on the principle that primary eye care is a basic human right that should be available to all.

Dr. Bath led a retrospective, epidemiological study which found Blacks to be twice as likely to experience blindness in comparison to whites due to lack of access to proper healthcare. She championed community ophthalmology which is still operational worldwide. Bath, a career researcher and laser scientist, also created a revolutionary device and technique. The first Black female doctor to receive a medical patent, Dr. Bath invented the laserphaco probe. To this day, her keratoprosthesis device is used to remove cataracts in a quicker, less invasive way.

Though she experienced sexism and racism numerous times during her career, Dr. Bath continued to break glass ceilings while achieving her personal best. As a founder of the American Institute for the Prevention of Blindness (AIPB), Bath advocated for telemedicine. She felt that electronic communication should be used to provide medical services in rural areas and wherever access to healthcare is limited. Dr. Patricia Bath, an American pioneer, died in May 2019.